search.noResults

search.searching

dataCollection.invalidEmail
note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
HIT POLICY UPDATE


What’s Next for TEFCA’s Recognized Coordinating Entity? One-on-One With The Sequoia Project’s CEO


Plenty of questions remain following the announcement that The Sequoia Project has been designated as TEFCA’s RCE


By Rajiv Leventhal


I


n September, industry stakeholders got a key health IT policy question of theirs answered when the Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) named The Sequoia Project as the organization that will be the Recognized Coordinating Entity (RCE), and which will manage and oversee Qualified Health Information Net- works (QHINs) under ONC’s Trusted Exchange Framework and Common Agreement (TEFCA).


For months, as health IT observers anxiously awaited the release of TEF- CA’s second draft, which was finally released in June, rumors about which group would make for the right choice to serve as RCE concurrently began to ramp up. Part of the second draft’s release included a $900,000 funding announcement for a nonprofit RCE in


year one, with funding in additional years contingent upon availability of funds and satisfactory completion of milestones.


In the eyes of many, The Sequoia


Project—originated in 2012 to advance healthcare interoperability, and which has managed the eHealth Exchange, which has become the largest health information network in the U.S., as well as supporting the Carequality initia- tive—felt like a natural fit. “Sequoia seemed to be the consensus likely choice, so this wasn’t a surprise. Most are eager to see what’s next and how this will advance interoperability,” says Dan Golder, principal at the Illinois- based consulting firm Impact Advisors. A core responsibility for the RCE will be to develop a Common Agreement that includes the Minimum Required


16 hcinnovationgroup.com | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2019


Terms & Conditions Draft 2 and Addi- tional Required Terms & Conditions (ARTCs) developed by the RCE and approved by ONC. The Common Agree- ment will be published on HealthIT.gov and in the Federal Register. It will then have to identify and monitor QHINs that voluntarily agree to sign and adopt the Common Agreement.


Golder believes that the develop- ment of the Common Agreement is the key next step, and greatest challenge, particularly with the targeted timeline for the first draft Common Agreement to be available this coming spring, further noting that it may be 2022 or later—pending possible delays—before TEFCA will be operational.


Following ONC’s RCE announce-


ment, Healthcare Innovation Managing Editor spoke with Mariann Yeager, CEO


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28